If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
We take urgent walk-ins. Call to inquire
Detroit-Jefferson (313) 821-3338​
West Detroit (313) 273-3780
Sterling Heights (586) 244-9699​
Hamtramck (313) 872-4076
Dearborn Heights (313) 563-0660
Tuesday, 25 January 2022 00:00

The plantar fascia is a thick band of tissue on the bottom of the foot that connects the heel with the forefoot. Because the plantar fascia is so instrumental in the mechanics of walking, it can become overloaded and stressed from overuse, excess weight, structural issues in the foot, or improper footwear. This strain can cause the plantar fascia to become excessively stretched, painful and inflamed. Tiny tears may also develop in the tissue, particularly where it connects with the heel bone. This condition is known as plantar fasciitis. The pain of plantar fasciitis tends to be worse in the morning or after periods of rest, and may lessen as you move around and warm up. Wearing footwear with insufficient support in the heel or walking barefoot can intensify the pain. If you believe you may have plantar fasciitis, it is important to seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible to treat the condition before it worsens.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists  from Bazzi Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Detroit, West Detroit, Sterling Heights, Hamtramck, and Dearborn Heights, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

Morton’s neuroma occurs when the tissue surrounding a nerve in the toes thickens in response to the nerve becoming entrapped, or otherwise irritated. This usually occurs between the third and fourth toes, however, it can also occur between the second and third toes. Morton’s neuroma can cause a burning pain in the ball of the foot. People with this condition sometimes explain the pain they feel as walking on a pebble or having a bunched-up sock in the front of their shoe. The toes may also feel numb or tingling, and there may be difficulty walking. Wearing shoes that are too tight or that compress your toes may sometimes contribute to the formation of Morton’s neuroma. This can include ski boots and ballet slippers too. Other foot dysfunctions that squeeze or put pressure on the toes can be contributing factors, such as flat feet, bunions, hammertoes, and high arches. Certain repetitive sporting activities may also be responsible. If you ever experience any of the symptoms mentioned here, call a podiatrist. They will examine you and run diagnostics to rule out other possible conditions and create a treatment plan to relieve pain and treat the underlying thickened tissue and nerve compression.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Bazzi Podiatry. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Detroit, West Detroit, Sterling Heights, Hamtramck, and Dearborn Heights, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

A condition common among the diabetic community is peripheral artery disease, PAD, which affects between 8-10 million people a year in the United States. Many of them are over 50 years old, studies show. PAD causes fatty buildup in the arteries, including those in the feet. The clogged arteries restrict blood flow, and if left undetected can lead to severe tissue damage. Among the most common symptoms of PAD are pain and numbness, especially when walking. Weakness, cold feet, and wounds that take a long time to heal are also telltale signs to look out for. Taking proper medication to reduce the inflammation in the arteries is important, along with regular exercise, eating nutritious foods, and giving up smoking. In severe cases of PAD, medication and lifestyle changes may not be enough. If the condition persists, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist as soon as possible for an evaluation and extensive treatment plan.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Bazzi Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Detroit, West Detroit, Sterling Heights, Hamtramck, and Dearborn Heights, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Saturday, 08 January 2022 00:00

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Connect with us